Forgot password?
Enter your email address

Sign out

Please hold your phone upright

Add a comment0
  • Ingredients
  • Gadgets
  • Recipe

Ingredients
Lime cordialMonin1oz
Lime zest1piece
Ice cubes7oz
Gadgets
Cocktail glass1piece
Shaker1piece
Strainer1piece
Jigger1piece
Zest knife1piece

  • Pour 1 oz of lime cordial and 2 oz of gin into a shaker
  • Fill the shaker with ice cubes and shake
  • Strain into a chilled cocktail glass
  • Garnish with lime zest

Cocktail Legend Gimlet

1867 | London, United Kingdom At the end of the 15th century, the great seafarer Vasco de Gama lost almost all of his crew on the way to India because of an epidemic of plague on board. Several centuries later, James Cook brewed spruce beer with sugar right on board his ship in a hopeless attempt to fight off scurvy. Only in 1747 did the chief physician of the Royal Naval Hospital at Gosport, James Lind conduct the first clinical trial in history and find out that the main reason behind the "sea plague" was a simple vitamin C deficiency. As a result, according to the Merchant Shipping Act of 1867, English sailors got the nickname "limeys" – citrus juice became a required part of sea rations. Long trips demanded non-perishable goods, and Scotsman Loughlin Rose jumped at the chance to patent a technology based on the method discovered by Louis Pasteur. It allowed fruit juice to be preserved without the use of alcohol. Ultimately, the first concentrated and sweetend mix, Rose's Lime...

1867 | London, United Kingdom At the end of the 15th century, the great seafarer Vasco de Gama lost almost all of his crew on the way to India because of an epidemic of plague on board. Several centuries later, James Cook brewed spruce beer with sugar right on board his ship in a hopeless attempt to fight off scurvy. Only in 1747 did the chief physician of the Royal Naval Hospital at Gosport, James Lind conduct the first clinical trial in history and find out that the main reason behind the "sea plague" was a simple vitamin C deficiency. As a result, according to the Merchant Shipping Act of 1867, English sailors got the nickname "limeys" – citrus juice became a required part of sea rations. Long trips demanded non-perishable goods, and Scotsman Loughlin Rose jumped at the chance to patent a technology based on the method discovered by Louis Pasteur. It allowed fruit juice to be preserved without the use of alcohol. Ultimately, the first concentrated and sweetend mix, Rose's Lime Cordial, made its appearance and immediately earned its sea legs. Officers who preferred gin immediately "married" it with the lime cordial and named the cocktail the "Gimlet" - either in honor of the tool used to open alcohol barrels or the Surgeon Rear-Admiral Sir Thomas Desmond Gimlette, famous for his assertion that gin and lime would only help medicine. Today, such mixes aren't served in the navy, but you can make a simple, tasty Gimlet yourself. The proportions are just like in a Dry Martini: from a half-shot to a drop of cordial, depending on how "dry" you like it.

Read more ▼

Cocktail Legend Gimlet

1867 | London, United Kingdom At the end of the 15th century, the great seafarer Vasco de Gama lost almost all of his crew on the way to India because of an epidemic of plague on board. Several centuries later, James Cook brewed spruce beer with sugar right on board his ship in a hopeless attempt to fight off scurvy. Only in 1747 did the chief physician of the Royal Naval Hospital at Gosport, James Lind conduct the first clinical trial in history and find out that the main reason behind the "sea plague" was a simple vitamin C deficiency. As a result, according to the Merchant Shipping Act of 1867, English sailors got the nickname "limeys" – citrus juice became a required part of sea rations. Long trips demanded non-perishable goods, and Scotsman Loughlin Rose jumped at the chance to patent a technology based on the method discovered by Louis Pasteur. It allowed fruit juice to be preserved without the use of alcohol. Ultimately, the first concentrated and sweetend mix, Rose's Lime Cordial, made its appearance and immediately earned its sea legs. Officers who preferred gin immediately "married" it with the lime cordial and named the cocktail the "Gimlet" - either in honor of the tool used to open alcohol barrels or the Surgeon Rear-Admiral Sir Thomas Desmond Gimlette, famous for his assertion that gin and lime would only help medicine. Today, such mixes aren't served in the navy, but you can make a simple, tasty Gimlet yourself. The proportions are just like in a Dry Martini: from a half-shot to a drop of cordial, depending on how "dry" you like it.

Comments (0)

To take part in the dialogue, you need to Log in.

To take part in the dialogue, you need to Log in.

You have disabled javascript in your browser. Our web site can not work properly without it.Enable it, please.