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  • Ingredients
  • Gadgets
  • Recipe

Cocktail ingredients White lady

Ingredients
Triple sec liqueur0.75oz
Lemon juice0.75oz
Lemon zest1piece
Ice cubes7oz
Gadgets
Sour glass1piece
Shaker1piece
Strainer1piece
Jigger1piece
Squeezer1piece
Zest knife1piece

Cocktail rrecipe White lady

  • Pour 0.75 oz of lemon juice, 0.75 oz of triple sec and 1.5 oz of gin into a shaker
  • Fill the shaker with ice cubes and shake
  • Strain into a chilled sour glass
  • Garnish with lemon zest

Cocktail Legend White Lady

1921 | London, United Kingdom The "White Lady" is a type of rose discovered in China in the 19th century, as well as a famous Wilkie Collins detective novel and perhaps even an aristocrat in a wedding gown. Choose the one you like best. Before us is the official drink of two independently-famous bars - Paris' Harry's New York and London's American Bar at the Hotel Savoy. From the beginning, there were even two different recipes with a single name. The first appeared in Harry MacElhone's book in 1919 while he was still working at London's Ciros club. It featured brandy as well as light mint and orange liqueurs. Meanwhile, his colleague and namesake in the neighboring Savoy, Harry Craddock, offered his version of the cocktail several years later - with gin, orange liqueur and lemon juice. In 1929, having moved to Paris and taken command of Harry's New York Bar, MacElhone changed the recipe, and like his colleague, he used a base of gin - and the drinks became identical. After all, the...

1921 | London, United Kingdom The "White Lady" is a type of rose discovered in China in the 19th century, as well as a famous Wilkie Collins detective novel and perhaps even an aristocrat in a wedding gown. Choose the one you like best. Before us is the official drink of two independently-famous bars - Paris' Harry's New York and London's American Bar at the Hotel Savoy. From the beginning, there were even two different recipes with a single name. The first appeared in Harry MacElhone's book in 1919 while he was still working at London's Ciros club. It featured brandy as well as light mint and orange liqueurs. Meanwhile, his colleague and namesake in the neighboring Savoy, Harry Craddock, offered his version of the cocktail several years later - with gin, orange liqueur and lemon juice. In 1929, having moved to Paris and taken command of Harry's New York Bar, MacElhone changed the recipe, and like his colleague, he used a base of gin - and the drinks became identical. After all, the colorless London dry gin suits the name better than brandy. Regardless of the "feminine" name, the drink is fairly strong and more likely than not - masculine. It should be noted that Anthony Hogg placed this drink second in the "big seven" of cocktails in his book, "Cocktails and Mixed Drinks" - after the Martini.

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Cocktail Legend White Lady

1921 | London, United Kingdom The "White Lady" is a type of rose discovered in China in the 19th century, as well as a famous Wilkie Collins detective novel and perhaps even an aristocrat in a wedding gown. Choose the one you like best. Before us is the official drink of two independently-famous bars - Paris' Harry's New York and London's American Bar at the Hotel Savoy. From the beginning, there were even two different recipes with a single name. The first appeared in Harry MacElhone's book in 1919 while he was still working at London's Ciros club. It featured brandy as well as light mint and orange liqueurs. Meanwhile, his colleague and namesake in the neighboring Savoy, Harry Craddock, offered his version of the cocktail several years later - with gin, orange liqueur and lemon juice. In 1929, having moved to Paris and taken command of Harry's New York Bar, MacElhone changed the recipe, and like his colleague, he used a base of gin - and the drinks became identical. After all, the colorless London dry gin suits the name better than brandy. Regardless of the "feminine" name, the drink is fairly strong and more likely than not - masculine. It should be noted that Anthony Hogg placed this drink second in the "big seven" of cocktails in his book, "Cocktails and Mixed Drinks" - after the Martini.

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