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  • Ingredients
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Cocktail ingredients Hurricane

Cocktail recipe Hurricane

  • Fill a hurricane glass to the top with ice cubes
  • Pour 1 oz of lime juice, 2 oz of orange juice and 2 oz of pineapple juice into a shaker
  • Add 0.5 oz of passionfruit syrup, 0.15 oz of grenadine syrup, 1 oz of dark rum and 1 oz of white rum
  • Fill the shaker with ice and shake thoroughly
  • Strain into the hurricane glass
  • Garnish with a lemon wheel

Cocktail Legend Hurricane

1940s | New Orleans, USA Any ancient story becomes interesting again if a long-since concluded chain of events sees a sudden alternative version arise. Thus occurred with a cocktail called the "Hurricane." As the common legend goes, the Hurricane, along with a mass of other cocktails, appeared during the difficult years of World War II in New Orleans. All necessary grain went to the army, so bars had difficulty with their supplies of quality whiskey, and merchants took advantage of this, "bundling" their much less popular rums with the deficit-struck whiskey. Pat O'Brien, the owner of New Orleans' Club Tipperary, found himself in this exact situation. Having suddenly become the owner 50 cases of rum without any hope of getting rid of it, Pat came up with a clever way out of the situation. He didn't just mix a new cocktail with rum that sharply increased sales, but connected its name with the notion of a "hurricane in a glass." It was this phrase that served as the password for all...

1940s | New Orleans, USA Any ancient story becomes interesting again if a long-since concluded chain of events sees a sudden alternative version arise. Thus occurred with a cocktail called the "Hurricane." As the common legend goes, the Hurricane, along with a mass of other cocktails, appeared during the difficult years of World War II in New Orleans. All necessary grain went to the army, so bars had difficulty with their supplies of quality whiskey, and merchants took advantage of this, "bundling" their much less popular rums with the deficit-struck whiskey. Pat O'Brien, the owner of New Orleans' Club Tipperary, found himself in this exact situation. Having suddenly become the owner 50 cases of rum without any hope of getting rid of it, Pat came up with a clever way out of the situation. He didn't just mix a new cocktail with rum that sharply increased sales, but connected its name with the notion of a "hurricane in a glass." It was this phrase that served as the password for all his hopeful guests to get inside O'Brien's speakeasy. Dale DeGroff, the "Cocktail King" himself and cocktail mythology evangelist, contradicts this neat and tidy legend. In his version, the first "Hurricane" was mixed at least ten years earlier and not in stuffy Louisiana, but in the woods of northern Wisconsin, on Big Bear Lake, in a bar also called the Hurricane. O'Brien, who had visited the location, simply copied the recipe. There's no sense in arguing over who's wrong and who's right, but there's no doubt that the crafty Irishman made the cocktail phenomenally popular and economically viable. He had the idea to stick a record-breaking amount of rum into the glass - 4 whole ounces, and masked it with the exotic taste of passionfruit, lime, and orange. He also put the cocktail in a pint-sized metal flask reminiscent of lighthouse keepers' kerosene lamps, which then become one of the chief symbols of the yearly Mardi Gras carnival.

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Cocktail Legend Hurricane

1940s | New Orleans, USA Any ancient story becomes interesting again if a long-since concluded chain of events sees a sudden alternative version arise. Thus occurred with a cocktail called the "Hurricane." As the common legend goes, the Hurricane, along with a mass of other cocktails, appeared during the difficult years of World War II in New Orleans. All necessary grain went to the army, so bars had difficulty with their supplies of quality whiskey, and merchants took advantage of this, "bundling" their much less popular rums with the deficit-struck whiskey. Pat O'Brien, the owner of New Orleans' Club Tipperary, found himself in this exact situation. Having suddenly become the owner 50 cases of rum without any hope of getting rid of it, Pat came up with a clever way out of the situation. He didn't just mix a new cocktail with rum that sharply increased sales, but connected its name with the notion of a "hurricane in a glass." It was this phrase that served as the password for all his hopeful guests to get inside O'Brien's speakeasy. Dale DeGroff, the "Cocktail King" himself and cocktail mythology evangelist, contradicts this neat and tidy legend. In his version, the first "Hurricane" was mixed at least ten years earlier and not in stuffy Louisiana, but in the woods of northern Wisconsin, on Big Bear Lake, in a bar also called the Hurricane. O'Brien, who had visited the location, simply copied the recipe. There's no sense in arguing over who's wrong and who's right, but there's no doubt that the crafty Irishman made the cocktail phenomenally popular and economically viable. He had the idea to stick a record-breaking amount of rum into the glass - 4 whole ounces, and masked it with the exotic taste of passionfruit, lime, and orange. He also put the cocktail in a pint-sized metal flask reminiscent of lighthouse keepers' kerosene lamps, which then become one of the chief symbols of the yearly Mardi Gras carnival.

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