Forgot password?
Enter your information
Sign out

Please hold your phone upright

Add a comment0
  • Ingredients
  • Gadgets
  • Recipe

Cocktail Ingredients in the Stinger

How to Make the Stinger

  • Fill a rocks glass to the top with crushed ice
  • Pour 1 oz of white mint liqueur and 2 oz of cognac into a shaker
  • Fill the shaker with ice cubes and shake
  • Strain into the rocks glass
How to Make the Stinger

Cocktail Legend Stinger

Cocktail Legend Stinger

1950s | San Francisco, USA For some, the Stinger is an American portable rocket launcher. Others immediately think of Sting, the British rock musician who got his nickname from his beloved itchy black-and-yellow sweater. Though the "Stinger" that contains a combination of cognac and mint liqueur is an excellent digestive, some prefer to start lunch with it - or even breakfast, especially when compensating for the "night before." It's no accident that in the 1956 film "High Society," Bing Crosby's character suggests to a lady played by Grace Kelly that she soothe her hangover with a Stinger, as it would "pull the stinger out of your head." The story of this drink, which "shoots straight for the head," begins in the beginning of the 20th century, when Bill Boothsby's book included the first recipe for the Stinger from J.C. O'Connor, the owner of a beautiful gentlemen's club located on the corner of Eddy and Market Streets in San Francisco. His formula consisted of one part white mint...

1950s | San Francisco, USA For some, the Stinger is an American portable rocket launcher. Others immediately think of Sting, the British rock musician who got his nickname from his beloved itchy black-and-yellow sweater. Though the "Stinger" that contains a combination of cognac and mint liqueur is an excellent digestive, some prefer to start lunch with it - or even breakfast, especially when compensating for the "night before." It's no accident that in the 1956 film "High Society," Bing Crosby's character suggests to a lady played by Grace Kelly that she soothe her hangover with a Stinger, as it would "pull the stinger out of your head." The story of this drink, which "shoots straight for the head," begins in the beginning of the 20th century, when Bill Boothsby's book included the first recipe for the Stinger from J.C. O'Connor, the owner of a beautiful gentlemen's club located on the corner of Eddy and Market Streets in San Francisco. His formula consisted of one part white mint liqueur, plus 3 parts cognac, shaken and served in a sherry glass. Traditionally, white mint liqueur is used for the Stinger. But if a desire to switch it out for its green counterpart arises, you'll get one its classic variations, the Green Jacket, whose fans include President Teddy Roosevelt and George Herbert Walker, the grandfather and great-grandfather of the Presidents Bush. In the 1950s, having become a symbol of big city life, the Stinger made a lasting impression in Film: "Kiss Them For Me" (1957), "The Apartment" (1960), and finally "Mad Men" - which resurrected the golden days of the Madison Avenue ad men of the era - won't let us cross the Stinger out of the annals of bar history today.

Read more ▼

Cocktail Legend Stinger

Cocktail Legend Stinger

1950s | San Francisco, USA For some, the Stinger is an American portable rocket launcher. Others immediately think of Sting, the British rock musician who got his nickname from his beloved itchy black-and-yellow sweater. Though the "Stinger" that contains a combination of cognac and mint liqueur is an excellent digestive, some prefer to start lunch with it - or even breakfast, especially when compensating for the "night before." It's no accident that in the 1956 film "High Society," Bing Crosby's character suggests to a lady played by Grace Kelly that she soothe her hangover with a Stinger, as it would "pull the stinger out of your head." The story of this drink, which "shoots straight for the head," begins in the beginning of the 20th century, when Bill Boothsby's book included the first recipe for the Stinger from J.C. O'Connor, the owner of a beautiful gentlemen's club located on the corner of Eddy and Market Streets in San Francisco. His formula consisted of one part white mint liqueur, plus 3 parts cognac, shaken and served in a sherry glass. Traditionally, white mint liqueur is used for the Stinger. But if a desire to switch it out for its green counterpart arises, you'll get one its classic variations, the Green Jacket, whose fans include President Teddy Roosevelt and George Herbert Walker, the grandfather and great-grandfather of the Presidents Bush. In the 1950s, having become a symbol of big city life, the Stinger made a lasting impression in Film: "Kiss Them For Me" (1957), "The Apartment" (1960), and finally "Mad Men" - which resurrected the golden days of the Madison Avenue ad men of the era - won't let us cross the Stinger out of the annals of bar history today.

Comments (0)

To take part in the dialogue, you need to Log in.

To take part in the dialogue, you need to Log in.

You have disabled javascript in your browser. Our web site can not work properly without it.Enable it, please.