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  • Ingredients
  • Gadgets
  • Recipe

Cocktail ingredients

Ingredients
Maraschino liqueur0.75oz
Violet liqueur0.15oz
Lemon juice0.5oz
Lemon zest1piece
Ice cubes10oz
Gadgets
Cocktail glass1piece
Strainer1piece
Jigger1piece
Mixing glass1piece
Squeezer1piece
Zest knife1piece
Bar spoon1piece

Cocktail recipe

  • Pour 0.5 oz of lemon juice, 0.75 oz of Maraschino liqueur, 0.15 oz of violet liqueur and 2 oz of gin into a mixing glass
  • Fill the glass with ice cubes and stir gently
  • Strain into a chilled cocktail glass
  • Garnish with lemon zest

Cocktail Legend Aviation

1916 | New York, USA Man has always dreamed of flying above the earth line a bird. This desire was first described in the legend of Icarus. Turning the myth into reality, ancient Greek philosopher Archytas built the first flying machine in the year 400 BCE. Leonardo Da Vinci's drawings of "wings for flight" remain famous to this day. The fairytale only started to become a reality in the 19th century. German Otto Lilienthal, having suffered a crash in one of his gliders, uttered his famous motto, "Small sacrifices must be made." Finally, in the lull between the two World Wars, the golden age of aviation began. Charles Lindbergh completed his trans-Atlantic flight, and in 1929, Count Zeppelin launched his first dirigible along the same route. In the luxurious interiors of his "flying castle," there was even space for a bar, where cocktails were made using silver zeppelin-shaped shakers. In the 1920s, aviation became a part of Hollywood, too: millionare Howard Hughes invested in the...

1916 | New York, USA Man has always dreamed of flying above the earth line a bird. This desire was first described in the legend of Icarus. Turning the myth into reality, ancient Greek philosopher Archytas built the first flying machine in the year 400 BCE. Leonardo Da Vinci's drawings of "wings for flight" remain famous to this day. The fairytale only started to become a reality in the 19th century. German Otto Lilienthal, having suffered a crash in one of his gliders, uttered his famous motto, "Small sacrifices must be made." Finally, in the lull between the two World Wars, the golden age of aviation began. Charles Lindbergh completed his trans-Atlantic flight, and in 1929, Count Zeppelin launched his first dirigible along the same route. In the luxurious interiors of his "flying castle," there was even space for a bar, where cocktails were made using silver zeppelin-shaped shakers. In the 1920s, aviation became a part of Hollywood, too: millionare Howard Hughes invested in the legendary film "Hell's Angels." Aviators became public heroes, and the word "aviation" itself was wrapped up in romantic flair, and bar culture couldn't escape this allure. In the classic American school of bartending, there were more than a few natives of Germany, the birthplace of the zeppelin. Among the major names of those years (Harry Johnson, George Kappeler) is the name Hugo Richard Ensslin, who tended bar at the no less famous Wallick Hotel in Times Square. In 1916, he published a collection called "Recipes for Mixed Drinks," where he included his "sky-blue" cocktail. In the 1930s, Ensslin's mix got its second wind: the AVIATION appeared in Harry Craddock's collection, having made its way to London's Savoy. On the way, the recipe lost its violet liqueur. Though four years later, Patrick Gavin Duffy published the original version once more in The Official Mixer's Manual, the violet liqueur has yet to return to popularity.

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Cocktail Legend Aviation

1916 | New York, USA Man has always dreamed of flying above the earth line a bird. This desire was first described in the legend of Icarus. Turning the myth into reality, ancient Greek philosopher Archytas built the first flying machine in the year 400 BCE. Leonardo Da Vinci's drawings of "wings for flight" remain famous to this day. The fairytale only started to become a reality in the 19th century. German Otto Lilienthal, having suffered a crash in one of his gliders, uttered his famous motto, "Small sacrifices must be made." Finally, in the lull between the two World Wars, the golden age of aviation began. Charles Lindbergh completed his trans-Atlantic flight, and in 1929, Count Zeppelin launched his first dirigible along the same route. In the luxurious interiors of his "flying castle," there was even space for a bar, where cocktails were made using silver zeppelin-shaped shakers. In the 1920s, aviation became a part of Hollywood, too: millionare Howard Hughes invested in the legendary film "Hell's Angels." Aviators became public heroes, and the word "aviation" itself was wrapped up in romantic flair, and bar culture couldn't escape this allure. In the classic American school of bartending, there were more than a few natives of Germany, the birthplace of the zeppelin. Among the major names of those years (Harry Johnson, George Kappeler) is the name Hugo Richard Ensslin, who tended bar at the no less famous Wallick Hotel in Times Square. In 1916, he published a collection called "Recipes for Mixed Drinks," where he included his "sky-blue" cocktail. In the 1930s, Ensslin's mix got its second wind: the AVIATION appeared in Harry Craddock's collection, having made its way to London's Savoy. On the way, the recipe lost its violet liqueur. Though four years later, Patrick Gavin Duffy published the original version once more in The Official Mixer's Manual, the violet liqueur has yet to return to popularity.

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