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  • Ingredients
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  • Recipe

Cocktail ingredients Americano

Ingredients
Red vermouthMartini1.5oz
Campari1.5oz
Club soda1.5oz
Orange zest1piece
Ice cubes6oz
Gadgets
Rocks glass1piece
Jigger1piece
Bar spoon1piece
Drinking straws2piece
Zest knife1piece

Cocktail recipe Americano

  • Fill a highball glass to the top with ice cubes
  • Pour in 1.5 oz of Campari and 1.5 oz of red vermouth
  • Top up with club soda and stir gently
  • Garnish with an orange wheel

Cocktail Legend Americano

1860s | Milan, Italy In spite of its name, this cocktail has 100% Italian roots. In the 1860s, Gaspare Campari, the founder of the Milanese company responsible for the eponymous bitter herbal liquer, opened a bar in his own name: Camparino. There, the Milanese bitter liqueur Campari was first mixed with sweet vermouth, added to club soda and named the Milano-Torino. In the beginning of the 1920s, the cocktail became popular among American tourists who sought salvation from Prohibition in Italy, which led to its being named the Americano. It should be noted that some specialists see a hidden meaning in the name: just as an Americano coffee is increased in volume and decreased in strength through dilution with hot water, the portion size of its cocktail namesake are "boosted" through the addition of club soda. In 1928, the recipe was first printed in "900 Recipes for American Drinks and Cocktails" by Adolphe Torelli, who was a bartender at the Winter's Palace hotel in Nice. A sizable...

1860s | Milan, Italy In spite of its name, this cocktail has 100% Italian roots. In the 1860s, Gaspare Campari, the founder of the Milanese company responsible for the eponymous bitter herbal liquer, opened a bar in his own name: Camparino. There, the Milanese bitter liqueur Campari was first mixed with sweet vermouth, added to club soda and named the Milano-Torino. In the beginning of the 1920s, the cocktail became popular among American tourists who sought salvation from Prohibition in Italy, which led to its being named the Americano. It should be noted that some specialists see a hidden meaning in the name: just as an Americano coffee is increased in volume and decreased in strength through dilution with hot water, the portion size of its cocktail namesake are "boosted" through the addition of club soda. In 1928, the recipe was first printed in "900 Recipes for American Drinks and Cocktails" by Adolphe Torelli, who was a bartender at the Winter's Palace hotel in Nice. A sizable number of fans of the Americano discovered it through its rich life in literature and film. In the first 007 novel, "Casino Royale," Ian Fleming has bond ordering an Americano, calling it a suitable drink for the "sunny terrace of a simple cafe," and preferring "Perrier, for in his opinion, expensive soda water was the cheapest way to improve a poor drink." It's worth mentioning that the soda syphon that Johnny Depp carries in "The Tourist" to make the cocktail himself in his Venetian hotel room looks much more in place, returning us to the origins of this Italian classic. Incidentally, the bar where the cocktail first appeared is still open at the very same location, in Milan's famous Galleria Vittorio Emanuele, so everyone who so wishes has a chance to discover the source for themselves.

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Cocktail Legend Americano

1860s | Milan, Italy In spite of its name, this cocktail has 100% Italian roots. In the 1860s, Gaspare Campari, the founder of the Milanese company responsible for the eponymous bitter herbal liquer, opened a bar in his own name: Camparino. There, the Milanese bitter liqueur Campari was first mixed with sweet vermouth, added to club soda and named the Milano-Torino. In the beginning of the 1920s, the cocktail became popular among American tourists who sought salvation from Prohibition in Italy, which led to its being named the Americano. It should be noted that some specialists see a hidden meaning in the name: just as an Americano coffee is increased in volume and decreased in strength through dilution with hot water, the portion size of its cocktail namesake are "boosted" through the addition of club soda. In 1928, the recipe was first printed in "900 Recipes for American Drinks and Cocktails" by Adolphe Torelli, who was a bartender at the Winter's Palace hotel in Nice. A sizable number of fans of the Americano discovered it through its rich life in literature and film. In the first 007 novel, "Casino Royale," Ian Fleming has bond ordering an Americano, calling it a suitable drink for the "sunny terrace of a simple cafe," and preferring "Perrier, for in his opinion, expensive soda water was the cheapest way to improve a poor drink." It's worth mentioning that the soda syphon that Johnny Depp carries in "The Tourist" to make the cocktail himself in his Venetian hotel room looks much more in place, returning us to the origins of this Italian classic. Incidentally, the bar where the cocktail first appeared is still open at the very same location, in Milan's famous Galleria Vittorio Emanuele, so everyone who so wishes has a chance to discover the source for themselves.

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