Forgot password?
Enter your email address

Sign out

Please hold your phone upright

Add a comment0
  • Ingredients
  • Gadgets
  • Recipe

Cocktail ingredients Dry martini

Cocktail recipe Dry martini

  • Pour 0.5 oz of dry vermouth and 2.5 oz of gin into a mixing glass
  • Fill the glass with ice cubes and stir gently
  • Strain into a chilled cocktail glass
  • Garnish with a green olive on a cocktail skewer

Cocktail Legend Dry Martini

1912 | New York, USA The story of how bartender Julio Richelieu, in order to give change to a gold prospector who paid him with a gold ingot in the city of Martinez, mixed so many cocktails that the guest lost all capacity of speech and ended up reducing "Martinez" to "Martini" is well-known. Let's just clarify that at the time, the only options in town were sweet gin and sweet vermouth. The point of departure for the Martini's modern history is 1912, when Italian Martini Di Arma Di Taggia, who shared the cocktail's namesake by pure chance, was working behind the bar of the chic New York bar "Knickerbocker," first mixed Martini in the classic proportions: two parts dry gin to one part dry vermouth. Since then, deviations from this proportion allow bartenders to play with taste: the less vermouth, the drier the cocktail. The garnish can change, too, from lemon zest to an olive, or even everything together. There are two extremes in the cocktail's execution: the Wet Martini ("wet"...

1912 | New York, USA The story of how bartender Julio Richelieu, in order to give change to a gold prospector who paid him with a gold ingot in the city of Martinez, mixed so many cocktails that the guest lost all capacity of speech and ended up reducing "Martinez" to "Martini" is well-known. Let's just clarify that at the time, the only options in town were sweet gin and sweet vermouth. The point of departure for the Martini's modern history is 1912, when Italian Martini Di Arma Di Taggia, who shared the cocktail's namesake by pure chance, was working behind the bar of the chic New York bar "Knickerbocker," first mixed Martini in the classic proportions: two parts dry gin to one part dry vermouth. Since then, deviations from this proportion allow bartenders to play with taste: the less vermouth, the drier the cocktail. The garnish can change, too, from lemon zest to an olive, or even everything together. There are two extremes in the cocktail's execution: the Wet Martini ("wet" here meaning a lot of vermouth), to the Naked Martini ("naked" meaning without any vermouth at all, or just a rinse of the glass). There are also Dirty Martinis (which are "tainted" with olive brine) and Gibsons - the same as the Dry Martini, but mixed with two pearl onions - to say nothing of the shaken "Bradford." The list can go on indefinitely. When vodka began to displace gin on bar menus in the 1960s, the Vodkatini appeared, immortalized by James Bond along with his instruction: "Shaken, not stirred." In fact, the formula means that the cocktail was no longer mixed with a bar spoon to absolute transparency, but shaken to achieve a more intoxicating effect. But nevertheless, the main thing about the Dry Martini is not the method of assembly, but the ice-cold temperature, requiring well-chilled glasses, refrigerated ingredients, ice, double freezing and other technological subtleties. Despite the apparent simplicity of the recipe, this cocktail demands taste, intuition, and attention to detailfrom the the bartender.

Read more ▼

Cocktail Legend Dry Martini

1912 | New York, USA The story of how bartender Julio Richelieu, in order to give change to a gold prospector who paid him with a gold ingot in the city of Martinez, mixed so many cocktails that the guest lost all capacity of speech and ended up reducing "Martinez" to "Martini" is well-known. Let's just clarify that at the time, the only options in town were sweet gin and sweet vermouth. The point of departure for the Martini's modern history is 1912, when Italian Martini Di Arma Di Taggia, who shared the cocktail's namesake by pure chance, was working behind the bar of the chic New York bar "Knickerbocker," first mixed Martini in the classic proportions: two parts dry gin to one part dry vermouth. Since then, deviations from this proportion allow bartenders to play with taste: the less vermouth, the drier the cocktail. The garnish can change, too, from lemon zest to an olive, or even everything together. There are two extremes in the cocktail's execution: the Wet Martini ("wet" here meaning a lot of vermouth), to the Naked Martini ("naked" meaning without any vermouth at all, or just a rinse of the glass). There are also Dirty Martinis (which are "tainted" with olive brine) and Gibsons - the same as the Dry Martini, but mixed with two pearl onions - to say nothing of the shaken "Bradford." The list can go on indefinitely. When vodka began to displace gin on bar menus in the 1960s, the Vodkatini appeared, immortalized by James Bond along with his instruction: "Shaken, not stirred." In fact, the formula means that the cocktail was no longer mixed with a bar spoon to absolute transparency, but shaken to achieve a more intoxicating effect. But nevertheless, the main thing about the Dry Martini is not the method of assembly, but the ice-cold temperature, requiring well-chilled glasses, refrigerated ingredients, ice, double freezing and other technological subtleties. Despite the apparent simplicity of the recipe, this cocktail demands taste, intuition, and attention to detailfrom the the bartender.

Comments (0)

To take part in the dialogue, you need to Log in.

To take part in the dialogue, you need to Log in.

You have disabled javascript in your browser. Our web site can not work properly without it.Enable it, please.