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  • Ingredients
  • Gadgets
  • Recipe

Cocktail ingredients Caipirinha

Ingredients
Cachaca2oz
Simple syrupMonin0.35oz
Lime1.5oz
Crushed ice5oz
Gadgets
Rocks glass1piece
Muddler1piece
Jigger1piece
Bar spoon1piece
Drinking straws2piece

Cocktail recipe Caipirinha

  • Cube half of a lime, place it into a rocks glass and muddle
  • Fill the rocks glass to the top with crushed ice
  • Pour in 0.35 oz of sugar syrup, 2 oz of cachaca and stir gently
  • Top up with crushed ice

Cocktail Legend Caipirinha

1918 | São Paulo, Brazil The name of Brazil's national cocktail, which translates from Portuguese as "little country bumpkin," gives a hint as to the history behind the Copacabana's house speciality. According to the Institute of Cachaça, the history of this famous cocktail begins back in 1918. The caipirinha that we know today came from a rural medicine made with lime, garlic and honey. Local doctors prescribed it for treating the Spanish flu, and added several spoonfuls of local rum to the mix to speed up its therapeutic effect. Then one fine day, somebody decided to leave out the garlic, increase the quantity of cachaça and replace the honey with sugar. All that was left to really capture the Carneval spirit was to add ice. It's worth noting that many Europeans learned of the caipirinha before they discovered cachaça. At the end of the 20th century, Cointreau promoted its orange liqueur by pushing a cocktail called the Cointreau Caipirinha. Why did the French promote one of their...

1918 | São Paulo, Brazil The name of Brazil's national cocktail, which translates from Portuguese as "little country bumpkin," gives a hint as to the history behind the Copacabana's house speciality. According to the Institute of Cachaça, the history of this famous cocktail begins back in 1918. The caipirinha that we know today came from a rural medicine made with lime, garlic and honey. Local doctors prescribed it for treating the Spanish flu, and added several spoonfuls of local rum to the mix to speed up its therapeutic effect. Then one fine day, somebody decided to leave out the garlic, increase the quantity of cachaça and replace the honey with sugar. All that was left to really capture the Carneval spirit was to add ice. It's worth noting that many Europeans learned of the caipirinha before they discovered cachaça. At the end of the 20th century, Cointreau promoted its orange liqueur by pushing a cocktail called the Cointreau Caipirinha. Why did the French promote one of their products using the caipirinha's name? There's a simple explanation. The French colonies had always had their own version of the village drink, the Ti' Punch. "Ti" comes from the word "petit," so it was a very small punch: rum from Guadeloupe or Martinique was added to a glass with lime, sugar and crushed ice and served with a spoon to mix it to taste. By the way, in addition to its little brother from France, the caipirinha has lots of independently successful spinoffs. For example: a caipirissima with rum, a caipiroska with vodka instead of cachaça, Dale DeGroff's caipiruva with grapes and the sakerinha, which is popular in Brazil today, made with sake.

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Cocktail Legend Caipirinha

1918 | São Paulo, Brazil The name of Brazil's national cocktail, which translates from Portuguese as "little country bumpkin," gives a hint as to the history behind the Copacabana's house speciality. According to the Institute of Cachaça, the history of this famous cocktail begins back in 1918. The caipirinha that we know today came from a rural medicine made with lime, garlic and honey. Local doctors prescribed it for treating the Spanish flu, and added several spoonfuls of local rum to the mix to speed up its therapeutic effect. Then one fine day, somebody decided to leave out the garlic, increase the quantity of cachaça and replace the honey with sugar. All that was left to really capture the Carneval spirit was to add ice. It's worth noting that many Europeans learned of the caipirinha before they discovered cachaça. At the end of the 20th century, Cointreau promoted its orange liqueur by pushing a cocktail called the Cointreau Caipirinha. Why did the French promote one of their products using the caipirinha's name? There's a simple explanation. The French colonies had always had their own version of the village drink, the Ti' Punch. "Ti" comes from the word "petit," so it was a very small punch: rum from Guadeloupe or Martinique was added to a glass with lime, sugar and crushed ice and served with a spoon to mix it to taste. By the way, in addition to its little brother from France, the caipirinha has lots of independently successful spinoffs. For example: a caipirissima with rum, a caipiroska with vodka instead of cachaça, Dale DeGroff's caipiruva with grapes and the sakerinha, which is popular in Brazil today, made with sake.

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