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  • Ingredients
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Cocktail ingredients Zombie

Cocktail recipe Zombie

  • Fill a tiki mug to the top with crushed ice
  • Pour 1 oz of lime juice, 1.5 oz of grapefruit juice, 1 oz of cinnamon syrup, 1.5 oz of dark rum and 1 oz of overproof rum into a shaker
  • Fill the shaker with ice cubes and shake
  • Strain into the tiki mug
  • Garnish with a grapefruit wedge and a mint sprig

Cocktail Legend Zombie

1934 | Los Angeles, USA It is believed that the effect on the body of two "Zombies" is equivalent to seven "Manhattans." That easily explains how the cocktail, invented in 1934 by Hollywood restaurant owner Don Beachcomber, instantly became famous in Hollywood circles. The main purpose of the cocktail was, according to its creator, "to put the dead back on their feet," but it is most often employed to achieve the opposite effect. Remember Holly Golightly, who chose "Zombies" to quickly get drunk: "Only promise me one thing. Don't take me home until i'm drunk. Very drunk indeed." Initially, Don served three portions of the new cocktail at once for a friend, as he saw him off on a trip to San Francisco. Upon returning, the friend told Don that the whole trip, he felt like a real zombie. This review gave the cocktail its famous name. Interestingly, Don later introduced the two-Zombie-per-guest limit. Despite the cocktail's quickly-growing popularity, his exact recipe was kept secret...

1934 | Los Angeles, USA It is believed that the effect on the body of two "Zombies" is equivalent to seven "Manhattans." That easily explains how the cocktail, invented in 1934 by Hollywood restaurant owner Don Beachcomber, instantly became famous in Hollywood circles. The main purpose of the cocktail was, according to its creator, "to put the dead back on their feet," but it is most often employed to achieve the opposite effect. Remember Holly Golightly, who chose "Zombies" to quickly get drunk: "Only promise me one thing. Don't take me home until i'm drunk. Very drunk indeed." Initially, Don served three portions of the new cocktail at once for a friend, as he saw him off on a trip to San Francisco. Upon returning, the friend told Don that the whole trip, he felt like a real zombie. This review gave the cocktail its famous name. Interestingly, Don later introduced the two-Zombie-per-guest limit. Despite the cocktail's quickly-growing popularity, his exact recipe was kept secret for a long time. Every bar wanted to attract guests with the "famous" Zombie, so variations on the cocktail began to appear and get passed off as the original. The recipe was first published in a book by Polynesian culinary and cultural guru, Jeff Berry, called "Sippin' Safari." In his book, Jeff tells a story about how Don himself attempted the classical recipe for the Zombie over a long period of time and prepared three different recipes, dating from 1934 to 1956. On 6 November 1940, pianist Fats Waller recorded a song called "Abercrombie Had a Zombie" that described the effects that several Zombies could have on a law-abiding citizen, turning him into a public threat. Inspired by music and cinema, Americans were ready to grab this cocktail right out of bartenders' hands and become a little bit more like their idols.

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Cocktail Legend Zombie

1934 | Los Angeles, USA It is believed that the effect on the body of two "Zombies" is equivalent to seven "Manhattans." That easily explains how the cocktail, invented in 1934 by Hollywood restaurant owner Don Beachcomber, instantly became famous in Hollywood circles. The main purpose of the cocktail was, according to its creator, "to put the dead back on their feet," but it is most often employed to achieve the opposite effect. Remember Holly Golightly, who chose "Zombies" to quickly get drunk: "Only promise me one thing. Don't take me home until i'm drunk. Very drunk indeed." Initially, Don served three portions of the new cocktail at once for a friend, as he saw him off on a trip to San Francisco. Upon returning, the friend told Don that the whole trip, he felt like a real zombie. This review gave the cocktail its famous name. Interestingly, Don later introduced the two-Zombie-per-guest limit. Despite the cocktail's quickly-growing popularity, his exact recipe was kept secret for a long time. Every bar wanted to attract guests with the "famous" Zombie, so variations on the cocktail began to appear and get passed off as the original. The recipe was first published in a book by Polynesian culinary and cultural guru, Jeff Berry, called "Sippin' Safari." In his book, Jeff tells a story about how Don himself attempted the classical recipe for the Zombie over a long period of time and prepared three different recipes, dating from 1934 to 1956. On 6 November 1940, pianist Fats Waller recorded a song called "Abercrombie Had a Zombie" that described the effects that several Zombies could have on a law-abiding citizen, turning him into a public threat. Inspired by music and cinema, Americans were ready to grab this cocktail right out of bartenders' hands and become a little bit more like their idols.

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