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Cocktail Ingredients in the Sazerac

How to Make the Sazerac

  • Fill a rocks glass to the top with ice cubes
  • Pour in 0.5 oz of absinthe and 0.35 oz of still water, then set aside
  • Place a sugar cube into a mixing glass
  • Soak the sugar with 3 dashes of Angostura bitters and 3 dashes of Peychaud's bitters and muddle
  • Add 1.5 oz of cognac and 1 oz of bourbon
  • Fill the glass with ice cubes and stir until the sugar dissolves
  • Pour out still water, absinthe and ice from the rocks glass
  • Strain the cocktail into the aromatized glass
  • Garnish with lemon zest
How to Make the Sazerac

Cocktail Legend Sazerac

Cocktail Legend Sazerac

1821 | New Orleans, USA This cocktail's story should be started from way back - specifically, from the 1791 slave uprising in the French colony of San Domingo, from which the Peychaud family escaped to their historical home. Everyone was in New Orleans save the youngest, Antoine, who was on the other side of the world. Phil Green, one of the founders of New Orleans' Museum of the American Cocktail, tells the story as follows: Antoine Amedie Peychaud was born in 1803, and left by his family in the care of distant relatives in Jamaica. He appeared in New Orleans in 1821, where in the 1830s he opened his own pharmacy on Royal Street. Antoine joined the Masons of the Concorde Blue Lodge. After their secret meetings, he holed up with his "brothers" in the pharmacy where he treated them to a mixture of brandy and the family bitters. The cocktail was served in an egg cup, which itself would later serve as a prototype for what would later become the jigger. In 1850, next to Peychaud's...

1821 | New Orleans, USA This cocktail's story should be started from way back - specifically, from the 1791 slave uprising in the French colony of San Domingo, from which the Peychaud family escaped to their historical home. Everyone was in New Orleans save the youngest, Antoine, who was on the other side of the world. Phil Green, one of the founders of New Orleans' Museum of the American Cocktail, tells the story as follows: Antoine Amedie Peychaud was born in 1803, and left by his family in the care of distant relatives in Jamaica. He appeared in New Orleans in 1821, where in the 1830s he opened his own pharmacy on Royal Street. Antoine joined the Masons of the Concorde Blue Lodge. After their secret meetings, he holed up with his "brothers" in the pharmacy where he treated them to a mixture of brandy and the family bitters. The cocktail was served in an egg cup, which itself would later serve as a prototype for what would later become the jigger. In 1850, next to Peychaud's pharmacy on Royal Street, the Merchants Exchange Coffee House opened, where Antoine was invited to prepare his now-popular "mixture" for guests. For the next several decades, the company changed owners and names more than once, ultimately turning into the Sazerac Company - a distributor which bought all the ingredients necessary to create the famous cocktail. Over all this time, the bitters' "partner," brandy, disappears from the recipe. It is replaced by rye whiskey, and soon absinthe finds its way into the recipe. In 2007, Ann Tuennermann, the founder of the Tales of the Cocktail festival, got the Louisiana Legislature to name the Sazerac as New Orleans' official cocktail.

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Cocktail Legend Sazerac

Cocktail Legend Sazerac

1821 | New Orleans, USA This cocktail's story should be started from way back - specifically, from the 1791 slave uprising in the French colony of San Domingo, from which the Peychaud family escaped to their historical home. Everyone was in New Orleans save the youngest, Antoine, who was on the other side of the world. Phil Green, one of the founders of New Orleans' Museum of the American Cocktail, tells the story as follows: Antoine Amedie Peychaud was born in 1803, and left by his family in the care of distant relatives in Jamaica. He appeared in New Orleans in 1821, where in the 1830s he opened his own pharmacy on Royal Street. Antoine joined the Masons of the Concorde Blue Lodge. After their secret meetings, he holed up with his "brothers" in the pharmacy where he treated them to a mixture of brandy and the family bitters. The cocktail was served in an egg cup, which itself would later serve as a prototype for what would later become the jigger. In 1850, next to Peychaud's pharmacy on Royal Street, the Merchants Exchange Coffee House opened, where Antoine was invited to prepare his now-popular "mixture" for guests. For the next several decades, the company changed owners and names more than once, ultimately turning into the Sazerac Company - a distributor which bought all the ingredients necessary to create the famous cocktail. Over all this time, the bitters' "partner," brandy, disappears from the recipe. It is replaced by rye whiskey, and soon absinthe finds its way into the recipe. In 2007, Ann Tuennermann, the founder of the Tales of the Cocktail festival, got the Louisiana Legislature to name the Sazerac as New Orleans' official cocktail.

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