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Cocktail ingredients Ramos gin fizz

Cocktail recipe Ramos gin fizz

  • Pour 0.75 oz of quail egg white, 0.5 oz of lemon juice, 0.5 oz of lime juice, 1.5 oz of light cream, 1 oz of sugar syrup and 1.5 oz of gin into a shaker
  • Add 0.15 oz of orange flower water
  • Give it a good dry shake
  • Fill the shaker with ice cubes and shake thoroughly again
  • Strain into a chilled collins glass
  • Top up with club soda and stir gently
How to Make the Ramos Gin Fizz

Cocktail Legend Ramos Gin Fizz

Cocktail Legend Ramos Gin Fizz

1887 | New Orleans, USA The first recipe for the fizz appeared in 1876 in the second edition of Jerry Thomas' cocktail guide. This was the Gin Fiz, to be fair, and no - the single 'z' is not a typo. Gin would stay part of the drink into the future, but with its growth in popularity, other alcohols were used as a base as well. In the 1880s, the GIN FIZZ became a speciality of New York's legendary Delmonico's Restaurant on Fifth Avenue, and to this day the cocktail is served in its original glass, named in honor of the establishment. With time, the fizz garnered a wide variety of twists. But perhaps the most paradoxical and therefore brilliant move was made by bartender Henry Carlos Ramos - Carl, for short. In his fizz, he mixed the unmixable: citrus juice and cream. In 1887, Carl and his brother opened the Imperial Cabinet Saloon in New Orleans' French Quarter, which quickly won the title of the city's main fizz spot. At the time, it was true handiwork: in order for the drink to come...

1887 | New Orleans, USA The first recipe for the fizz appeared in 1876 in the second edition of Jerry Thomas' cocktail guide. This was the Gin Fiz, to be fair, and no - the single 'z' is not a typo. Gin would stay part of the drink into the future, but with its growth in popularity, other alcohols were used as a base as well. In the 1880s, the GIN FIZZ became a speciality of New York's legendary Delmonico's Restaurant on Fifth Avenue, and to this day the cocktail is served in its original glass, named in honor of the establishment. With time, the fizz garnered a wide variety of twists. But perhaps the most paradoxical and therefore brilliant move was made by bartender Henry Carlos Ramos - Carl, for short. In his fizz, he mixed the unmixable: citrus juice and cream. In 1887, Carl and his brother opened the Imperial Cabinet Saloon in New Orleans' French Quarter, which quickly won the title of the city's main fizz spot. At the time, it was true handiwork: in order for the drink to come out fluffy without the cream curdling from the citrus, every cocktail had to be shaken as long as possible, up to 15 minutes. During Mardi Gras, Ramos hired six strong black men especially to "hammer out" the fizzes, relieving each other non-stop. In 1907, Ramos moved his establishment closer to the center of the Quarter and called it the Stag Saloon. During Mardi Gras in 1915, he had 35 of those black men working for him, who in turn had worked out a specialized serving technique by which they would shake the cocktail and hand it off to each other like a conveyer belt, creating a flawless system of mass fizz production. For his invention, Ramos earned the title of "Benefactor of the Human Race," and his cocktail - "a flower that you can drink!"

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Cocktail Legend Ramos Gin Fizz

Cocktail Legend Ramos Gin Fizz

1887 | New Orleans, USA The first recipe for the fizz appeared in 1876 in the second edition of Jerry Thomas' cocktail guide. This was the Gin Fiz, to be fair, and no - the single 'z' is not a typo. Gin would stay part of the drink into the future, but with its growth in popularity, other alcohols were used as a base as well. In the 1880s, the GIN FIZZ became a speciality of New York's legendary Delmonico's Restaurant on Fifth Avenue, and to this day the cocktail is served in its original glass, named in honor of the establishment. With time, the fizz garnered a wide variety of twists. But perhaps the most paradoxical and therefore brilliant move was made by bartender Henry Carlos Ramos - Carl, for short. In his fizz, he mixed the unmixable: citrus juice and cream. In 1887, Carl and his brother opened the Imperial Cabinet Saloon in New Orleans' French Quarter, which quickly won the title of the city's main fizz spot. At the time, it was true handiwork: in order for the drink to come out fluffy without the cream curdling from the citrus, every cocktail had to be shaken as long as possible, up to 15 minutes. During Mardi Gras, Ramos hired six strong black men especially to "hammer out" the fizzes, relieving each other non-stop. In 1907, Ramos moved his establishment closer to the center of the Quarter and called it the Stag Saloon. During Mardi Gras in 1915, he had 35 of those black men working for him, who in turn had worked out a specialized serving technique by which they would shake the cocktail and hand it off to each other like a conveyer belt, creating a flawless system of mass fizz production. For his invention, Ramos earned the title of "Benefactor of the Human Race," and his cocktail - "a flower that you can drink!"

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