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  • Ingredients
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Cocktail ingredients Tom collins

Cocktail recipe Tom collins

  • Fill a collins glass to the top with ice cubes
  • Pour 0.75 oz of lemon juice, 0.75 oz of sugar syrup and 1.5 oz of gin into a shaker
  • Fill the shaker with ice cubes and shake
  • Strain into the collins glass
  • Top up with club soda and stir gently
  • Garnish with an orange wheel and a red Maraschino cherry

Cocktail Legend Tom Collins

1930 | London, United Kingdom It's not every that a hotel waiter, like Gustav from "The Grand Budapest Hotel," becomes the center of love and attention. This story is one just like that. Chubby little John Collin had an unusual level of energy and amazingly colorful turns of phrase. It's possible that Richard Brinsley, a famous Anglo-Irish playwright, and a no-less-famous author by the nickname, "Boz" - perhaps better known as Charles Dickens, who was friends with John and even visited his home village near London, where the latter was laid to rest after 40 years of work as the headwaiter at Limmer's. Our hero's signature drink was the "Gin Punch," whose recipe and description are lost to history - but there is an opinion, that this punch was awfully similar to the drink served at London's Harwick Club and contained gin, lemon juice, Maraschino liqueur and soda water. Thanks to the officers of the Royal Army, the drink was not just named in honor of its creator but came with them on...

1930 | London, United Kingdom It's not every that a hotel waiter, like Gustav from "The Grand Budapest Hotel," becomes the center of love and attention. This story is one just like that. Chubby little John Collin had an unusual level of energy and amazingly colorful turns of phrase. It's possible that Richard Brinsley, a famous Anglo-Irish playwright, and a no-less-famous author by the nickname, "Boz" - perhaps better known as Charles Dickens, who was friends with John and even visited his home village near London, where the latter was laid to rest after 40 years of work as the headwaiter at Limmer's. Our hero's signature drink was the "Gin Punch," whose recipe and description are lost to history - but there is an opinion, that this punch was awfully similar to the drink served at London's Harwick Club and contained gin, lemon juice, Maraschino liqueur and soda water. Thanks to the officers of the Royal Army, the drink was not just named in honor of its creator but came with them on their deployments to America. According to New York World, officers of the royal artillery even taught the bartenders of New York's Clarendon Hotel to make the John Collins. In 1876, the popularity of this summery drink made it to Louisiana, where the "father of all bartenders" Jerry Thomas included it in his second bartenders guide, under the name of "Tom Collins." In doing so, he also gave comedians a new star of their jokes: for decades, jokesters would ask each other, "Have you seen Tom Collins?" Since then, variations for every taste have appeared. Those who like whiskey have settled on the John Collins; those who prefer tequila took to the Pepito; cognac lovers have the Pierre; and the Pedro Collins is there for rum connoisseurs.

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Cocktail Legend Tom Collins

1930 | London, United Kingdom It's not every that a hotel waiter, like Gustav from "The Grand Budapest Hotel," becomes the center of love and attention. This story is one just like that. Chubby little John Collin had an unusual level of energy and amazingly colorful turns of phrase. It's possible that Richard Brinsley, a famous Anglo-Irish playwright, and a no-less-famous author by the nickname, "Boz" - perhaps better known as Charles Dickens, who was friends with John and even visited his home village near London, where the latter was laid to rest after 40 years of work as the headwaiter at Limmer's. Our hero's signature drink was the "Gin Punch," whose recipe and description are lost to history - but there is an opinion, that this punch was awfully similar to the drink served at London's Harwick Club and contained gin, lemon juice, Maraschino liqueur and soda water. Thanks to the officers of the Royal Army, the drink was not just named in honor of its creator but came with them on their deployments to America. According to New York World, officers of the royal artillery even taught the bartenders of New York's Clarendon Hotel to make the John Collins. In 1876, the popularity of this summery drink made it to Louisiana, where the "father of all bartenders" Jerry Thomas included it in his second bartenders guide, under the name of "Tom Collins." In doing so, he also gave comedians a new star of their jokes: for decades, jokesters would ask each other, "Have you seen Tom Collins?" Since then, variations for every taste have appeared. Those who like whiskey have settled on the John Collins; those who prefer tequila took to the Pepito; cognac lovers have the Pierre; and the Pedro Collins is there for rum connoisseurs.

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